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  • Writer's pictureNicholas Shea

JavaScript [Module 1, Post 1]

Part of me thought about skipping the first few exercises because they seemed redundant. To be fair, most of it was. There were also a number of long-ish videos (7 minutes) that talked about the utility of JS that was clearly geared toward people looking to become professional programmers, rather than a hobbyist like myself. Outside of this, here are the cool/fun things I learned that differed slightly from my understanding of other languages. Most of this focuses on data types.


Data types, operators

There are seven data types in JS: strings, numbers, Boolean, null, undefined, BigInt, and symbol.


//DATA TYPES

//strings must be in single or double quotes

//numbers can be presented without modification

//Boolean has only two types, true and false

//Null is the absence of value

//Undefined, a variable that has not yet been assigned a variable

//BigInt is an extra-large box that can hold large numbers or groups of numbers.

//Symbol is like a box with the same label as other boxes but each has a different serial number.


//OPERATORS

//assignment operators and logical operators

//assignment operators (+, -, /, *) plus, minus, divide, multiply

//logical operators (&&, ||, !); check if two or more conditions are true, at least one is true, not


Much of this feels really familiar thanks to R and dplyr.


Specifics on numbers, strings, and booleans

/* <- I remembered that you can use this instead of double forward slashes for each line as long as you close it with *\


/*

NUMBERS

** = to the power of;

% = mod(ulous);

JS will follow order of operations unless you use parentheses


STRINGS

a collection of characters in quotes or double quotes

"Hello there!"

'It's a lovely day' doesn't work, but

"It's a lovely day" does because of different types of quotes


BOOLEAN (tests)

(==), equals;

(===), value AND type;

100 == "100", TRUE because values are the same even though type is not

100 === "100", FALSE because value is not the same as type

(!=), does not equal

 *\


When I was going through BOOLEANs I was trying to brainstorm where you might want to use the triple equals sign. Maybe in a password manager where the pw must include characters and numbers.


Thoughts so far

I'm a little more than halfway through Module 1. So far so good. I'm looking forward to doing some of the assessments that are coming up next.

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